MICROCURRENT THERAPY

What is Microcurrent Therapy?

Microcurrent Therapy applies low-level electrical currents (microcurrents) through connecting electrode sensors to your body. This therapy helps treat different physical health problems such as nerve or muscle damage/pain and inflammation, but also it helps athletes perform at higher levels by improving tissue healing and muscle protein synthesis.

Every tissue within the body has a unique electrical frequency. Sometimes these tissues may become damaged or disrupted. By conducting these electrical currents, Microcurrent Therapy restores these tissues back to their normal states. We offer Alpha-Stim™ Microcurrent therapy to counter a variety of pain conditions and mental health issues (such as anxiety, insomnia, and depression) that these conditions accompany.

Evidence

There is a great number of research demonstrating Microcurrent Therapy as an effective approach to treating a wide range of physical and mental health conditions.

For a comprehensive bibliography of Microcurrent Therapy Research, please visit the links below:

www.alpha-stim.com/healthcare-professionals/research-and-reports

https://www.alpha-stim.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Bibliography-as-of-January-2018.pdf


Anxiety

1. LU Ling, HU Jun. A Comparative study of anxiety disorders treatment with Paroxetine in combination with cranial electrotherapy stimulation therapy. Medical Innovation of China, 11(08):080-082, 2014

ABSTRACT:The results of this study showed that six weeks of combining paroxetine with daily CES treatments, yielded significant improvement over paroxetine alone on the HAM-A scale from baseline to 6 weeks out.

2. Kolesos ON, Osionwo HO, Akkhigbe. The role of relaxation therapy and cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the management of dental anxiety in Nigeria. ISOR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences. 2013; 10(4): 51-57

ABSTRACT:The combination of relaxation and cranial electrotherapy stimulation significantly reduced dental anxiety and found beneficial for alleviating dental anxiety among dental patients.

3. Strentzsch, Julie A. An examination of cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) on alpha-amylase levels, cortisol levels and state-trait anxiety scores in the chronically mentally ill. Doctoral Dissertation, Saint Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas, 2008

ABSTRACT:A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and 38 subjects completed all post-test requirements; active CES group (N=15), sham group (N=15). The active CES group had significantly lower scores on the State Anxiety Index (SAI), indicating less state anxiety, than the sham group (P=.02, d = -.41) or control group.

4. Voris, Marshall D. An investigation of the effectiveness of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in the treatment of anxiety disorders among outpatient psychiatric patients, impulse control parolees and pedophiles. Delos Mind/Body Institute Newsletter. 1995. Dallas and Corpus Cristi, Texas

ABSTRACT:A total of 105 subjects completed the study consisting of an active CES group (N= 38), sham group (N=35). The active CES group had significantly lower anxiety scores on the State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) compared to sham group (p=.0001, d = -1.60).

5. Kim, Hyun Jung, Kim, Woon Young, Lee, Yoon Sook, Chang, Moon Seok, Kim, Jae Hwan, and Park, Young Cheol The Effect of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation on Preoperative Anxiety and Hemodynamic Responses. Korean Journal ofAnesthesiology. 2008; 55(6): 657- 661

ABSTRACT:Sixty (60) adults between the ages of 18-65 were subjects in this study. The CES group had lower anxiety scores on the Likert scale compared to the control group at the endpoint of the study (p < 0.01, d = -.88).

Insomnia

6. Taylor, Ann Gill, Anderson, Joel G., Riedel, Shannon L., Lewis, Jante E., Kinser, Patricia A., and Bourguignon, Cheryl. Cranial electrical stimulation improves symptoms and functional status in individuals with fibromyalgia. Pain Management Nursing. 2013 Dec;14(4):327-335

ABSTRACT:Those individuals using the active CES device had a greater decrease in average pain (p 1⁄4 .023), fatigue (p 1⁄4 .071), and sleep disturbance (p 1⁄4 .001) than individuals using the sham device or those receiving usual care alone over time. Addition- ally, individuals using the active CES device had improved functional status versus the sham device and UC groups over time (p 1⁄4 .028).

7. Lichtbroun, Alan S., Raicer, Mei-Ming C., and Smith, Ray B. The Treatment of Fibromyalgia with Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. 2001; 7(2):72-78. Presented at the Fifteenth Annual International Symposium on Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics, Columbia University, New York, October 1999.

ABSTRACT:The active CES group had significant findings on 8 of the 11 variables compared to the sham group: significantly lower anxiety scores (p=0.04, d = -.60), higher quality of sleep scores (p = 0.02,d = .45), lower pain scores (p = .004, d = .65), higher feelings of well-being scores (p = .007, d = .73)

8. Lande, R. Gregory and Gragnani, Cynthia. Efficacy of cranial electric stimulation for the treatment of insomnia: A randomized pilot study. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 21(1):8-13, 2013

ABSTRACT:
The researchers identified a nearly significant increase in total time slept after three cranial electric stimulation treatments among all study subjects

9. Yennurajalingam S, Kang D-H, Hwu W-J, Padhye NS, Masino C, Dibaj SS, Liu DD, Williams JL, Lu Z, Bruera E. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for the management of depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and pain in patients with advanced cancer: a preliminary study. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. E-published ahead of print, September, 2017.

ABSTRACT:In this preliminary study we found that the use of CES was safe and feasible in ACP. The use of CES was associated with significant improvement of depression, anxiety, pain, and sleep scores.

Depression

10. Barclay TH, Barclay RD. A clinical trial of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety and comorbid depression. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2014; 164:171-177. Presented at the American Psychological Association National Conference, Honolulu, HI, July 2013

ABSTRACT:
Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between the active CES group and the sham CES group on anxiety (p1⁄40.001, d1⁄40.94) and on depression (p1⁄40.001, d1⁄40.78) from baseline to endpoint of study in favor of the active CES group. CES significantly decreases anxiety and comorbid depression. Subjects reported no adverse events during the study.

11. Mellen, Ronald R. and Mackey, Wade. Reducing Sheriff’s Officers’ Symptoms of Depression Using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES): A Control Experimental Study. The Correctional Psychologist. 2009; 41(1):9-15

ABSTRACT:
The active CES group had significantly lower depression scores on the BDI (p<0.05) data-preserve-html-node=”true” and the BSI-D (p< 0.01) than the sham group. The finding suggested a broad trend toward reductions in the full range of clinical symptoms

12. Chen Yixin, Yu Lin, Zhang Jiuping, Li Lejia, Chen Tunong, Chen Yi. Results of cranial electrotherapy stimulation to children with mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry. 2007; 19(4):203-205

ABSTRACT:
CES is effective for treating children with MAD. CES can affect brain electrical activity mapping of occipital lobe.

13. Yennurajalingam S, Kang D-H, Hwu W-J, Padhye NS, Masino C, Dibaj SS, Liu DD, Williams JL, Lu Z, Bruera E. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for the management of depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and pain in patients with advanced cancer: a preliminary study. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. E-published ahead of print, September, 2017

ABSTRACT:
In this preliminary study we found that the use of CES was safe and feasible in ACP. The use of CES was associated with significant improvement of depression, anxiety, pain, and sleep scores. These findings support further studies of CES in ACP for symptom control.

14. Lu XY, Wang AH, Li Y, Zhang JS, Liu BX. Safety and effectiveness of cranial electrotherapy stimulation in treating children with emotional disorders. Chinese Journal of Clinical Rehabilitation. 2005; 9(8):96-7.

ABSTRACT:
CES is a new technique for the treatment of emotional disorders; it has the advantages of fast effect, significant efficacy, as well as the characteristics of accumulative effect, fewer relapse and no side effects.

Pain


15. Taylor, Ann Gill, Anderson, Joel G., Riedel, Shannon L., Lewis, Jante E., Kinser, Patricia A., and Bourguignon, Cheryl. Cranial electrical stimulation improves symptoms and functional status in individuals with fibromyalgia. Pain Management Nursing. 2013 Dec;14(4):327-335

ABSTRACT:
Those individuals using the active CES device had a greater decrease in average pain (p 1⁄4 .023), fatigue (p 1⁄4 .071), and sleep disturbance (p 1⁄4 .001) than individuals using the sham device or those receiving usual care alone over time. Addition- ally, individuals using the active CES device had improved functional status versus the sham device and UC groups over time (p 1⁄4 .028).

16. Lichtbroun, Alan S., Raicer, Mei-Ming C., and Smith, Ray B. The Treatment of Fibromyalgia with Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. 2001; 7(2):72-78. Presented at the Fifteenth Annual International Symposium on Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics, Columbia University, New York, October 1999.

ABSTRACT:
The active CES group had significant findings on 8 of the 11 variables compared to the sham group: significantly lower anxiety scores (p=0.04, d = -.60), higher quality of sleep scores (p = 0.02,d = .45), lower pain scores (p = .004, d = .65), higher feelings of well-being scores (p = .007, d = .73)

17. Taylor, Ann Gill, Anderson, Joel G., Riedel, Shannon L., Lewis, Janet E. and Bourguignon, Cheryl. A randomized, controlled, double-blind pilot study of the effects of cranial electrical stimulation on activity in brain pain processing regions in individuals with fibromyalgia. Explore. 2013; 9(1):32-40

ABSTRACT:
The observed decrease in activation in the pain processing regions may indicate a decrease in neural activity in these regions that may be related to decreased pain. This is the first randomized, controlled trial of CES in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia to report functional magnetic resonance im- aging data.

18. Tan, Gabriel, Rintala, Diana, Jensen, Mark P., Richards, J. Scott, Holmes, Sally Ann, Parachuri, Rama, Lashgari-Saegh, Shamsi and Price, Larry R. Efficacy of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury: a multi-site randomized controlled trial with a secondary 6-month open-label phase. The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. 2011; 34(3):285-296.

ABSTRACT:
On average, CES appears to have provided a small but statistically significant improvement in pain intensity and pain interference with few troublesome side effects. Individual results varied from no pain relief to a great deal of relief.

19. Tan, Gabriel, Rintala, Diana H., Thornby, John, Yang, June, Wade, Walter, and Vasilev, Christine. Using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation to Treat Pain Associated with Spinal Cord Injury. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development. 2006; 43(4):461-474. Presented at the South Central VA Health Care Network’s Pain Management Initiative 2nd Annual Pain Management Symposium: Campaign Against Pain. Jackson, Mississippi, April 7, 2006

ABSTRACT:
Cranial electro- therapy stimulation (CES), a noninvasive technique that deliv- ers a microcurrent to the brain via ear clip electrodes, has been shown to effectively treat several neurological and psy- chiatric disorders. The results suggest that CES can effectively treat chronic pain in persons with SCI

What benefits do you get from doing Microcurrent Therapy with Elumind ?

Reduce or treat pain associated with nerves, muscles and tissue inflammation
Increase blood flow to affected areas in order to reduce pain and affliction
Assist cellular detoxification in the body
Enhance cellular repair mechanisms by increasing ATP (energy units of your body)
Decrease in healing time by an increase in protein synthesis